Heavy Haul Services
truckersjourney:

Trailer door wide open going down i5 & paying none of us no mind trying to get his attention. I was hoping the pallet jack didn’t roll out & some of his freight. Double check & triple check your equipment. #trucking #truckersjourney #truckinglife #lifeontheroad #overtheroad #otr #america #journey #bigtruck

truckersjourney:

Trailer door wide open going down i5 & paying none of us no mind trying to get his attention. I was hoping the pallet jack didn’t roll out & some of his freight. Double check & triple check your equipment. #trucking #truckersjourney #truckinglife #lifeontheroad #overtheroad #otr #america #journey #bigtruck

Heavy Hauling

Heavy Hauling

Heavy Haul Trailer Arrangements of Long Combination Vehicles (LCVs)

Road trains are more popularly known as Long Combination Vehicles (LCVs), Extended Length Vehicles (ELVs) or Energy Efficient Motor Vehicles (EEMVs) in Canada. There are four types of LCV which are allowed namely: turnpike doubles, triples, rocky mountain doubles, and queen city triples. The turnpike doubles is made up of a tractor unit pulling a semi-trailer up to 53 feet long.  A-type or C-type converter is attached to the rear of the trailer, and carries a second trailer. The lead trailer may have a hideaway fifth wheel which make possible for direct coupling of the second trailer without a converter.

The total allowable length is 125 feet. The triples may be up to 115 feet in length when using C or A  converters, or 125 feet in B-train configuration. Rocky mountain doubles are limited to 102 feet in overall length but have the advantage of being legal on two-lane, undivided roads. A, B and C- train variations are utilized. Other LCVs may be only driven on divided highways. Queen city triples comprise of a tractor unit pulling one semi-trailer up to 53 feet long and two short “pup” trailers up to 32 feet long. Queen city triples are only allowed between the cities of Saskatoon and Regina Saskatchewan.

These are the longest combinations allowed in North America on public Highways. B-doubles are allowed to operate at the Coquihalla Highway LCV. But in Alberta LCV operation is allowed on most major highways. The rocky mountain doubles are allowed in Edmonton since the destination of these vehicles is Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories. The Northwest Territories allow LCVs of up to 101.7 feet in length. These vehicles used for heavy hauling are limited to specific destinations in Hay River and Yellowknife.

Trailers for heavy hauling have different arrangements. A B-double or B-Train contains a prime mover towing a specific lead trailer which has a fifth wheel connected on the rear towing another semi-trailer. Around container ports in Australia there may be a super B-double which has a quad axle lead trailer can hold one 40-foot shipping container or two 20-feet shipping containers and the rear trailer can likewise do the same with either a tri or quad rear axle set. Yet because of their enormous length and low accessibility into narrow streets these vehicles are not permitted in where they can go and are usually used for terminal-to-terminal work.

The rear axle on each trailer can also swivel a little while turning to avoid scrubbing out the edges of the tires because of the heavy loads on them. With the B-double, it is the same only with an additional lead trailer behind the prime mover. An AB triple consists of a prime mover, a semi-trailer, a converter dolly and a B-double. A BAB Quad includes two B-double units linked with a converter dolly. A C-train is a semi-trailer connected to a fifth wheel on a C-dolly. The C-dolly is attached to the tractor or another trailer in front of it with two draw-bars, thereby removing the attachment.  A dog trailer also known as a pup is any trailer which is attached to a converter dolly with a single A-frame draw bar which fits into the pintle hook on the rear of the trailer.

See more of the Heavy Haul and how it begins.